Patrick McGrath, The Grotesque

£50.00

First novel made into a film by cult writer. Although McGath has a slim output as a novelist his reputation is such that he is widely seen as a modern macabre heir to Edgar Allan Poe. The Grotesque has been called “modern gothic” – a subversion of the traditional country house murder mystery and is noted in the 500 Essential Cult Books (Gina McKinnon).

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Patrick McGrath, The Grotesque. New York, Poseidon Press, 1989. First edition, Advance Uncorrected Proof in blue buff card wrapper. 8 1/4 x 5 1/4. The first novel by an important niche writer.

Patrick McGath grew up in the the grounds Broadmoor Psychiatric Hospital, where his father worked. Broadmoor is famous in British criminal history for it housed such people as Ian Brady (the “Moors Murder”) and Peter Sutcliffe (the “Yorkshire Ripper”). Although McGath has a slim output as a novelist his reputation is such that he is widely seen as a modern macabre heir to Edgar Allan Poe. The Grotesque has been called “modern gothic” – a subversion of the traditional country house murder mystery and is noted in the 500 Essential Cult Books (Gina McKinnon).

Plotline: Wheelchair-using Sir Hugo Coal narrates this tale of vice and murder at stately Crook Manor. Unable to communicate with those around him, the quirky Sir Hugo watches and listens, recounting recent events that began with his daughter’s engagement, followed by the disappearance of her fiancé and the subsequent investigation. Of particular note is new butler Fledge, whom Sir Hugo believes is not only the cause of the troubles at the estate, but seeking to replace him as lord of the manor and in Lady Harriet’s bed.

The Grotesque was made into a cult film with Alan Bates, John Mills, Sting, Trudie Styler (Sting’s wife) and Maria Aiktin (McGath’s wife) in 1993. Other novels such as Asylum and Spider have been made into films.

Condition: Fine except slight fading of spine.

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