Michael Connelly, Angel’s Flight

£50.00

For many years Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch police detective series has almost come to define the police procedural crime novel. He always wanted to be a crime novelist and took work as a reporter in Florida and later in Los Angeles to gain experience. The Bosch opus now spans seventeen books and Connelly has regularly received awards. He has been a crime author with a strong following with collectors for many years. It was fortune for them that we were able to have the creator of several important crime series and screenwriter on ‘The Wire’, George Pelecanos to do the appreciation.

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For many years Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch police detective series has almost come to define the police procedural crime novel. He always wanted to be a crime novelist and took work a reporter Florida and later in Los Angeles to gain experience. His protagonist, is a Vietnam vet, an experience that gives the character a backstory and an attitude. He is a good but cynical cop, who frequently finds the ‘authorities’ – be they the police department, the FBI, the judiciary or media – to get in the way of an investigation. The Bosch books are not mysteries in the conventional sense, they are suspense narratives within a police procedural framework; they have interesting characters, and like some of his contemporaries he likes to give them a credible feel. It is not surprising that Connelly once rented an apartment near where Raymond Chandler lived. Inspiration and that feel are all important. Both Connelly and Bosch quality to be in our category of ‘Legends and Heroes’.

Plotline: When the body of high profile black lawyer Howard Elias is found inside one of the cars on Angels Flight, a cable railway in downtown Los Angeles, there’s not a detective in the city who wants to touch the case. For Elias specialized in lawsuits alleging police brutality, racism, and corruption, and every LAPD cop is a possible suspect in his killing. Detective Harry Bosch is put in charge. Elias’s murder occurred on the eve of a major trial: on behalf of black client, Michael Harris, Elias was to bring a civil case against the LAPD for violent interrogation tactics that had caused his client the partial loss of his hearing. Harris had been acquitted of the rape and murder of a twelve-year-old girl, but many, including Bosch, believe him guilty. Elias had let it be known that the trial would serve a dual purpose — to target and bring down the guilty cops and to expose the real murderer of the little girl. Post Rodney King, the 1992 riots, and the trial of O.J. Simpson, the City of Angels is living on its nerves. To discover the truth Harry must dig deep in his own backyard — except that it’s a minefield of suspicion and hate that could detonate in his face. And as if he didn’t have enough on his mind, his happiness with Eleanor Wish looks to be short-lived. Five cards on the felt are pulling her back to a place where Harry cannot follow, back to herself.

Angel’s Flight (1998) was issued in a run of 115 numbered and signed copies together with 16 specials for presentation. They all sold prior to publication. Indeed, Michael Connelly has been a crime author with a strong following with collectors since Black Echo won the Edgar for Best First Novel. It was fortune for them that we were able to have the creator of several important crime series and screenwriter on ‘The Wire’, George Pelecanos to do the appreciation. Collectors may also wish to note that Michael Connelly also wrote appreciations of James Lee Burke, Robert Crais, and Jeffrey Deaver.

4.00 out of 5

2 reviews for Michael Connelly, Angel’s Flight

  1. 3 out of 5

    Rating by Kirkus Review on June 12, 2012 :

    Kirkus Review
    The murder of a high-profile civil rights lawyer is just the trigger for another far-ranging case for L.A. cop Harry Bosch (Trunk Music, 1997, etc.). Howard Elias was widely known as the man who made a good living by suing the LAPD. So now that he’s been shot, along with inoffensive cleaning woman Catalina Perez, aboard an otherwise empty inclined railway car, cops all over the city are cheering. What’s not to like? wonders Bosch. Only two things: the likelihood that Elias was helped to his grave by one of the hundreds of officers now toasting his death, and the certainty that the public will scream coverup and react in riotous fury if Bosch turns up anybody but a fellow cop as a suspect. Under pressure to satisfy Deputy Chief Irvin Irving, who’s determined to put his own Rainbow Coalition p.r. spin on every development, and to work peacefully with the Internal Affairs officers he’s been saddled with, Bosch soon focuses on Elias’s latest client: Michael Harris, the scruffy suspect who maintains that his confession in the murder of pre-teen Stacey Kincaid had been beaten out of him by cops who jumped on their first slim lead that came their way. But even as Bosch is turning up evidence that indicates Harris might be innocent after all–many sordid, though unsurprising, revelations here–the net is closing around his former partner Frankie Sheehan, a Robbery-Homicide detective on the Harris case who’d already caught the eye of Internal Affairs when he killed a suspect in an earlier case. Bosch sweats to exonerate his old friend and find a substitute killer, but Deputy Chief Irving, who can’t forget O.J. and Rodney King, is just not that interested in getting Sheehan off the hook. Reliable suspense on a grand scale, though the half-hearted attention to the suspects and Harry’s perfunctory domestic troubles, as well as the lack of a powerfully mysterious center, make this the most routine of Connelly’s eight world-class thrillers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rating by George P Pelecanos on June 12, 2012 :

    Extract from the Appreciation by George P Pelecanos

    Back in 1991, I was tending night bar in a drinker’s saloon down on 2nd and C in Northwest D.C., struggling with a novel during the day, and picking up book, movie, and music review gigs on the side to make ends meet. The crime books that were being sent to me for review were, for the most part, uninspired. But one novel, The Black Echo, a debut by a young writer named Michael Connelly, did stand out. In my review, written for a mystery publication, I called The Black Echo a “superior effort,” and “a fine first novel introducing a solid talent.” Even with that, I could not have predicted the importance of the body of work that Connelly would produce over the course of the decade. I’ve just closed the cover on Angels Flight, the new Michael Connelly, and the sixth of his eight books to feature protagonist Harry Bosch. I started the book on a Saturday, on the Philly-to-D.C. Metroliner, and I finished it two days later, on the same southbound train from New York to D.C. A train is the perfect place to devour a Connelly – no phones, no distractions, and no guilt. Because once you begin a Connelly novel, you are compelled to continue on, uninterrupted, until the final page. Angels Flight is vintage Connelly, a full throttle read. In Angels Flight, LAPD detective Harry Bosch investigates a double-homicide that has fuelled tensions in an already-volatile Los Angeles. (Bosch stoically proceeds to do his job while the city burns, much as Lew Archer did as the California hill fires raged in Ross Macdonald’s 1971 classic, The Underground Man). As is his custom, Connelly, an award-winning journalist and crime reporter, draws heavily here from both the headlines and headline-makers. He also explores, through dialogue and subtle shading of character, the issues of race and class in America, as well as the complexity and role of corruption in law enforcement and the courts. The corruption-of-power line goes back to Chandler, of course, but Connelly digs deeper to lay out the workings of the modern police force with authority and detail. One is tempted to call the Bosch novels “police procedurals,” but the term suggests a kind of literary sterility and inertia, and obscures Connelly’s knack for narrative drive. It’s true that his books are incredibly detailed, but at the same time they move. He paces, plots, and twists the reader’s expectations expertly, and he gets better at it with each successive novel.

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